Milka_3

 

 

Nikola Mihov was a prominent Bulgarian army commander at the turn of the XX century. A career officer who managed to stay clear of politics in the turbulent 1930s, he ran the country's Military Academy till 1941. In 1942 he became a defence minister in Bulgaria's Nazi-allied government. In the summer of 1943 General Mihov was appointed as one of the three regents to the boy King Simeon after the death of his father King Boris.

Just over a year later, after the Communist takeover of Bulgaria, Nikola Mihov's fate took a dramatic turn – he was arrested, taken to the Soviet Union for questioning, then returned, put on show trial in Sofia and executed together with 96 other statesmen and prominent Bulgarians. They were all shot and buried in a mass grave on 1-2 February 1945.

Lyudmila Doytchinova was Nikola Mihov's niece. She remembered vividly the day her uncle vanished.

 

Filmed in Sofia, 2008

Published in YOUR STORY

49 years ago, at dawn on 21 August 1968, the armies of the Warsaw Pact countries (except Romania) crossed the borders of Czechoslovakia and toppled the government of Alexander Dubček. His attempts to reform the Communist regime and aspirations of a Socialism with a human face inevitably put Prague on a collision course with Moscow. The orders from Moscow were brief - the status quo had to be preserved at any cost, the Prague Spring was doomed and the tanks rolled in.

Do you remember the Prague Spring?

Five nations sent their troops, including Bulgaria. Most of the Bulgarian soldiers went via the Soviet Union, where they were briefed. Only a few of them knew the exact destination, though they were all told that their mission was to stop a counter-revolution and prevent a West German invasion. The Bulgarian soldiers stayed in Czechoslovakia till October.

Изминаха 48 години от най-мащабната операция на български войски след Втората световна война, при това не на учение, а инструктирани за бойни действия. Призори на 21 август 1968 г. войските на страните от Варшавския договор (без Румъния) навлизат в Чехословакия. Това е краят на Пражката пролет и на опитите на тогавашния водач на Чехословакия Александър Дубчек за реформи и "социализъм с човешко лице".

Бяхте ли с набори 1948-1949 в Чехословакия през лятото на 1968? Знаете ли нещо от вашите родители за тези събития?

Published in Bulgaria
Letter Home 1915

A moving document from another era. A German soldier writes back home from occupied Serbia, 1915. Passed by the military censor.

In which Emir Kusturica movie does this Serbian spa feature?!

What else was Banja Koviljača remarkable for during the Cold War?

Published in Balkans

 

74 years ago on 10-11 March 1943 Bulgaria's pro-Nazi government decided to defy Berlin and halt the deportation of Bulgaria's 50.000 Jews. This was mainly down to the actions of one man - Dimitar Peshev.

Just two years later he faced Communist justice and found himself on trial for his life. 

His niece Kaluda Kiradjieva remembered.

Published in Bulgaria

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© Velislav Radev

Vintage Communist narrative

Converted from 16 mm film

Published in Bulgaria

Rescued and converted from a 16mm film.

This Bulgarian government video presents the skiing resort of Pamporovo as a hotspot of catering and hedonism. In reality, some of its East German tourists were killed, while trying to cross the nearby border with Greece.

Пампорово, 1979-та. 16 мм филм. Идилия за външна консумация. В непосредствена близост до граничната зона, лобно място на източногермански туристи.

Published in Bulgaria

16 mm silent film.

The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact was named after the Soviet foreign minister Vyacheslav Molotov and the German foreign minister Joachim von Ribbentrop.

The rapprochement between the Soviet Union and Germany in the summer of 1939 led to an agreement officially signed in Moscow in the late hours of 23 August 1939 - the Treaty of Non-Aggression between Germany and the Soviet Union. It was a non-aggression pact under which the two countries were to remain neutral  in the event that either nation were attacked by a third party. The treaty also included a secret protocol dividing Northern and Eastern Europe into German and Soviet spheres of influence.  It sealed off the fate of Poland and the Baltic states.

Molotov_Ribbentrop_MyCent

Soon after the signing of the treaty, Germany and the Soviet Union invaded Poland and divided the country between them.

The date of signing, 23 August, is commemorated each year across the EU as the European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism.

Molotov_Ribbentrop_4_Russian

Molotov_3_German

 

Published in Red Square

 

Germany opens with Nazi pomp a trade show in Sofia. Bulgaria's Prime Minister Prof. Bogdan Filov attending.

Германия открива в нацистки стил в София свое Индустриално изложение в присъствието на министър председателя проф. Богдан Филов, 1942.

Published in Bulgaria