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Photography: © Grigory Rudko

Дом на Набережной, The House on the Embankment, across the river from the Kremlin. Built 1928 - 1931 to house Communist party apparatchiks and other hacks, during the purges of the 1930s hundreds of its residents were taken away.

'Bread' or 'fruit' vans would arrive, usually at night, to drag whole families off to be shot or to the Gulag camps. Today the house has some of Moscow's most expensive properties.

Shot in Moscow, September 2009 - January 2010.

Embankment House Museum

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© Velislav Radev

A dacha colony just to the south-west of Moscow, in Soviet times reserved for writers and artists. Today the complex is popular with bankers and others who can afford to live there.

© Velislav Radev

Kelvedon Hatch, just outside London, was one of Britain's top secrets during the Cold War. Built in the 1950s into the hillside, this colossal underground bunker was to house more than 600 people and to keep them going for up to 3 months – had Britain come under a nuclear attack from Moscow.

The Royal Air Force was to control from here its response to a nuclear attack. It was also to become the Headquarters of an emergency Central British Government, including the Prime Minister's office.

Geiger radiation counters
Communications Room
Home Office Radio Room
Emergency communications
Emergency radio studio for the Prime Minister of the day
Triangulation, Map Room
Map Room
Room for the Prime Minister of the day
Commissioner's room
Sick bay for routine operations
Government departments
Information on how to survive
Government communications room

© Velislav Radev

On arrival in New York, April 1967

28 February 1926, Moscow - November 2011, Wisconsin

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At the height of the Cold War British independent film maker John Dooley travelled to the Soviet Union. His educational film about the European parts of the country is rather matter-of-fact. An unusual document of its time.

Early 1960s, Plymouth Films Ltd, now defunct.

Converted from a 16 mm film.

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Promotional video for the Soviet police, the Militia.

Ваша профессия? Сотрудник милиции.

16 mm film, 1970s

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Клуб Foto.ru

Широкая натура. Приезд Леонида Брежнева в Узбекистан, 1979.

Leonid Brezhnev arriving in Uzbekistan. 1979

Dmitri Baltermants, Дмитрий Бальтерманц

Courtesy: Moscow House of Photography

 

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Dhikr is an ancient Sufi religious practice, widespread in Chechnya. It looks like a religious dance, even though the participants say it’s not. The authors Olga Kravets, Maria Morina, Oksana Yushko say:

"Dhikr is a very emotional event, with lots of energy in the air that even made us non-Muslims willing to join the circle of rushing, jumping and calling the name of God. The multimedia project Dhikr is part of the ongoing work 'Grozny: 9 cities', showing different aspects of life in the Chechen capital in the aftermath of the war. It will consist of stills, multimedia and text. After the dhikr we had a long conversation with the local religious leader Alu, who was leading the whole ceremony, he spoke a lot about how Chechens want peace and that dhikr is one way of praying for it. The religious leader was also saying that when the dhikr takes place nothing bad happens in the world.

As we were driving home a call came from a source in the law enforcement authorities who said there was an explosion on the other side of Grozny, just about the time we were talking about dhikr and peace. Relatives of one of the suicide bombers, a 17-year old boy, who had blown himself up in Grozny as policemen tried to stop him, publicly disavowed him on TV. Dhikr is the way to peace in the heart, but the pot is boiling in the Chechen Republic."

©2010 Olga Kravets, Maria Morina, Oksana Yushko

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