Yugoslavia_1961_3

 

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by a British family from the North of England visiting the Adriatic coast in 1960.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

 

 

Published in Balkans

Yugo_1978_3

A rare Kodachrome film, 1978.

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by British tourists who were visiting the Adriatic coast in the summer of 1978.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 8 mm film.

All rights to use purchased.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

This Kodachrome film is just a beautiful and non-political piece of history. More on the seemingly still open question whether Yugoslavia was a Communist society despite its relatively open borders, was it dogmatic...did it ever try do deal with events of the recent past, like Bleiburg or the fate of its ethnic Germans, Istria, is available on: 

Tito in Moscow 1972

Communist Nostalgia

Published in Balkans
Letter Home 1915

A moving document from another era. A German soldier writes back home from occupied Serbia, 1915. Passed by the military censor.

In which Emir Kusturica movie does this Serbian spa feature?!

What else was Banja Koviljača remarkable for during the Cold War?

Published in Balkans

Yugoslavia on Kodachrome

A rare Kodachrome film for Pan Am Airways, 1964.

MyCentury.tv

Yugoslavia was the only Communist-controlled country in today's Eastern Europe Pan Am flew to during the Cold War – showing how important the country was at that time.

A cultural icon of the XX Century, Pan American World Airways, or Pan Am, was the largest international air carrier in the US from 1927 until its collapse its 1991.

Pan-Am is remembered by many for its routes to divided Berlin - Tempelhof and Tegel.

Did you fly on Pan Am to Yugoslavia or West Berlin? Did you visit Yugoslavia's Adriatic coast, or perhaps Ohrid?

Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

All rights to use purchased.

This Kodachrome film is just a beautiful and non-political piece of history. More on the seemingly still open question whether Yugoslavia was a Communist society despite its relatively open borders, was it dogmatic...did it ever try do deal with events of the recent past, like Bleiburg or the fate of its ethnic Germans, Istria... is available on: 

Tito in Moscow 1972

Communist Nostalgia

Published in Balkans

 

Natalya Grebenyuk is a Moscow-based photographer and photo editor. She is a fan of motor-rallies and daunting car journeys. Natalya crossed the Balkans from East to West at the height of the Winter 2010 - from Kosovo via Montenegro to Albania and Bosnia.

 

© Natalya Grebenyuk

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

 

First days of diplomacy and of the fighting in independent Bosnia. First attackers and first defenders.
Sarajevo, 23 April - 3 May 1992.

 

From The Death of Yugoslavia. 'Brian Lapping' for the BBC, October 1995

Published in Balkans

 

Syria-born Aimen Awad on Bosnia's Islamic fighters during the war.

Bosnian public TV, BHT, Sarajevo, 24. 11. 2009

Awad has lived in the Balkans since 1982, first in Croatia, then in Bosnia, and fought in the "El Mujaheed" unit of foreign fighters during the 1995-96 war. In May 2009 he was arrested by the Bosnian police in Zenica. The police said they were hunting foreign-born Muslims who fought in the war and stayed in Bosnia as "illegal aliens". Aimen Awad has complained he would be jailed in Syria for fighting abroad. He is now fighting a legal battle against his extradition. Aimen Awad is married to a Bosnian woman and the family has 4 children.

Thousands of Islamic fighters fought during the war with Bosnian Muslims against Bosnian Croats and Bosnian Serbs. Most of them left the country under US pressure in the late 1990s but some remained after marrying locally.

Published in Balkans

Bosnian Serbs celebrate St. George's Day. Mount  Romanija, near Sarajevo - May 1991.

In the intoxicating atmosphere of gunfire, nationalist euphoria, Balkan grill in the forest, a prayer and a blessing.

Indicted war-criminals Radovan Karadzic and Vojislav Šešelj with a group of Chetniks. Vojislav Šešelj announces his 'Karlobag-Ogulin-Karlovac-Virovitica' line.

It's a hypothetical boundary often used to describe the western extent of Serbian aspirations. Vojislav Šešelj often claimed that all of the population of these areas are in fact 'ethnic Serbs, of Orthodox, Roman Catholic or Muslim faith.'

Amateur footage, Bosnian Serb collection. 

Published in Balkans