Sofia_horseman_1907

 

Sofia, 'The Grand Boulevard', 1907. By the British writer Harry de Windt.

In his book 'Through Savage Europe', a journey from the Adriatic Sea to the Caucasus,  De Windt writes: '...This quaint mixture of the latest European fashions and Oriental costumes are the first things which strike the stranger on arrival in Sofia. But he soon discovers that this is a land of contradictions.

For instance, the man who drove us to our hotel from the station was an essentially modern Bulgar who, as far as dress was concerned, would have walked unnoticed up Regent Street, and who was as loquacious and full of information as a Maltese guide. Indeed he was up-to-date on every subject, from the newest style of motor-car to Mr. Chamberlain's fancy in orchids.

And yet his wiry little pair of ponies were adorned with necklets of blue beads as amulets against the (Turkish) "Evil Eye," any allusion to which was strongly resented by their driver…'

Published in Bulgaria

Prizren 1974

Do you remember the old Marash area from these days? Did you live here? We'd like to hear from you.

Published in Balkans
Matija Biljeskovic - Return to Prizren

Matija Bilješković comes from the picturesque town of Prizren in Kosovo.

He's spent almost all his life abroad, but has returned home now to stay.

Published in YOUR STORY
Letter Home 1915

A moving document from another era. A German soldier writes back home from occupied Serbia, 1915. Passed by the military censor.

In which Emir Kusturica movie does this Serbian spa feature?!

What else was Banja Koviljača remarkable for during the Cold War?

Published in Balkans

Cinema Komunisto, 2010 (trailer). The director Mila Turajlić: "When reality has a different script from the one in your film, who wouldn't invent a country to fool themselves?"

Published in Balkans

kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project
kravets mladic easter project

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

Prizren. Second largest city of Kosovo. The only trilingual city in the Balkans, with Albanian, Turkish and Serbian/Bosnian spoken. Capital of the medieval Serbian Empire in the 14th Century. Preserved its Ottoman character better than any other city in the Balkans. Natalya Grebenyuk is a Moscow-based photographer. She is a fan of motor-rallies and daunting car journeys. Natalya crossed the Balkans from East to West at the height of the winter 2010: from Kosovo via Montenegro to Albania and Bosnia.

Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren
Prizren

© Natalya Grebenyuk

© Velislav Radev

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

 

This report by Mark Urban shows the effect of operation 'Storm' ('Oluja') on the civilian population of the town of Knin. It was a joined operation of the Croatian armed forces with the Bosnian Army.

Broadcast on 8 August 1995, BBC2 / Newsnight

 

On 5th August 1995 Croatian forces entered Knin. In Croatia 5th August is celebrated as a national holiday, 'Victory and Homeland Thanksgiving Day', in Serbia it is marked by commemorations to the killed and exiled. Operation 'Storm' led to the displacement of the entire local Serbian population.

The Croatian government estimates that around 90,000 Serb civilians had fled, Serbian sources claimed that there were as many as 250,000 refugees. The UN puts the figure at between 150,000 and 200,000, the BBC at 200,000. Hundreds of Serb civilians were killed - mostly elderly people who stayed on after their families had left.

The Hague War Crimes Tribunal indicted 3 senior Croatian commanders: Colonel General Čermak, Colonel General Markač and General Ante Gotovina. They were said to have had personal and command responsibility for war crimes carried out against Krajina Serb civilians.

Čermak and Markač were handed over to The Hague Tribunal, but Gotovina fled in 2001. He remained on the run for more than 4 years, his whereabouts surrounded by mystery.  The issue was a major obstacle for Croatia's application to join the EU. At the end of 2005 Ante Gotovina was captured by Spanish police in a hotel in the Canary Islands and transferred to The Hague.

 

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Published in Balkans

Bosnian Serbs celebrate St. George's Day. Mount  Romanija, near Sarajevo - May 1991.

In the intoxicating atmosphere of gunfire, nationalist euphoria, Balkan grill in the forest, a prayer and a blessing.

Indicted war-criminals Radovan Karadzic and Vojislav Šešelj with a group of Chetniks. Vojislav Šešelj announces his 'Karlobag-Ogulin-Karlovac-Virovitica' line.

It's a hypothetical boundary often used to describe the western extent of Serbian aspirations. Vojislav Šešelj often claimed that all of the population of these areas are in fact 'ethnic Serbs, of Orthodox, Roman Catholic or Muslim faith.'

Amateur footage, Bosnian Serb collection. 

Published in Balkans