YU_Promo_1975

 

A remarkable document about how a Communist state saw itself and its place in a divided world.

Promotion for the Yugoslav State Tourism Office in 1975 -- focusing on natural beauty, heritage /including religion/ and open borders.

Unlike the other Communist states, Tito's Yugoslavia kept the country's borders open – both for its own citizens, who were allowed to work in Western Europe, and for foreigners, who travelled unhindered individually, from the Alps to Macedonia. This brought hard currency to the state and also, in effect, kept domestic dissent to a minimum, as Yugoslavs enjoyed privileges out of reach for their Eastern neighbours.

Transferred from 16 mm film in 2016.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans

Yugoslavia_1975

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US.

Here is an extract from a film, commissioned by the Yugoslav National Tourism Office in 1975. With some marvellous sequences from Belgrade and Croatia!

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans
Yugoslavia_1961_3

 

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by a British family from the North of England visiting the Adriatic coast in 1960.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

 

 

Published in Balkans

Yugo_1978_3

A rare Kodachrome film, 1978.

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by British tourists who were visiting the Adriatic coast in the summer of 1978.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 8 mm film.

All rights to use purchased.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

This Kodachrome film is just a beautiful and non-political piece of history. More on the seemingly still open question whether Yugoslavia was a Communist society despite its relatively open borders, was it dogmatic...did it ever try do deal with events of the recent past, like Bleiburg or the fate of its ethnic Germans, Istria, is available on: 

Tito in Moscow 1972

Communist Nostalgia

Published in Balkans

The stunning town of Mostar on the river Neretva was ravaged by the Bosnian war in successive campaigns. First a siege by the Yugoslav army left it badly damaged. Then came the bitter conflict between Croat forces and local defenders, loyal to the government in Sarajevo, on the eastern bank of the river.

When the war finished across Bosnia in 1996 the scars were visible everywhere in Mostar, and little was known about the fate of Serb civilians in the area. In these pictures you see UN peacekeepers visiting the Serb village of Lakat, before they return home themselves to face an unknown future in their native Ukraine. Oleksandr Klymenko was there with his camera.

Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym
Mostar Klym

Photography: © Oleksandr Klymenko

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

Scenes from traditional jumping from the Stari Most bridge in the old town of Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Leaping from the bridge into the Neretva river is a rite of passage for the town's young men, and continues on despite the bridge's destruction during the Croat-Bosniak War in 1992-1994.

Shot on location for ESPN

Published in Balkans

Natalya Grebenyuk is a Moscow-based photographer. She is a fan of motor-rallies and daunting car journeys. Natalya crossed the Balkans from East to West at the height of the winter 2010: from Kosovo via Montenegro to Albania and Bosnia.

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© Natalya Grebenyuk

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

This Newsnight film shows the Croatian Party of Rights (HSP) getting ready for action: politically and militarily, through its armed wing HOS, the Croatian Defence Forces, Hrvatske obrambene snage.

A right wing political party, the HSP, Hrvatska stranka prava, is the oldest in Croatia, tracing its origin to the 1860s. Often embarrassing for the Zagreb leadership, and better equipped than the Croatian army, HOS included among its ranks Croats, Bosnian Muslims and many foreign volunteers: ethnic Croats and non-ethnic Croats alike. In August 1992 its leader Blaž Kraljević, who had spent decades in exile in Germany and Australia, was ambushed in Herzegovina and killed, together with eight other HOS members.

Croats_HOS_1.jpg

Prosecutors at the Hague Tribunal (ICTY) have implied that Kraljević was murdered by Croat leaders because his HOS believed in a "multi-ethnic Bosnia of the Croats and Muslims working together..." After Kraljević's assassination HOS dissolved into the Croatian army and into the Croat armed forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina / Herceg Bosna - the HVO.

December 1991, David Sells

Blaž Kraljević can be seen on:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcy7HQlv4as&feature=related

Published in Balkans