YU_Promo_1975

 

A remarkable document about how a Communist state saw itself and its place in a divided world.

Promotion for the Yugoslav State Tourism Office in 1975 -- focusing on natural beauty, heritage /including religion/ and open borders.

Unlike the other Communist states, Tito's Yugoslavia kept the country's borders open – both for its own citizens, who were allowed to work in Western Europe, and for foreigners, who travelled unhindered individually, from the Alps to Macedonia. This brought hard currency to the state and also, in effect, kept domestic dissent to a minimum, as Yugoslavs enjoyed privileges out of reach for their Eastern neighbours.

Transferred from 16 mm film in 2016.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans
Published in Balkans
Published in Balkans

Slovenia_75a

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Slovenia had offered tourist attraction since the 19th Century.

Here is an extract from a film, commissioned by the Yugoslav National Tourism Office in 1975. With some marvellous sequences from Slovenia!

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans

Macedonia_1975

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US.

Here is an extract from a film promotion of Macedonia by the Yugoslav National Tourism Office in 1975. With some very rare footage of Skopje and Ohrid.
Transferred from 16 mm film.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans

Yugoslavia_1975

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US.

Here is an extract from a film, commissioned by the Yugoslav National Tourism Office in 1975. With some marvellous sequences from Belgrade and Croatia!

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine

Published in Balkans

Kingdom_Yugoslavia_1929

 

A very rare item from our collection. Converted from a silent 16 mm film, with titles. 

British production with some of the earliest moving pictures from the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, newly renamed by King Alexander I in 1929.

Apart from the Adriatic coast, Bosnia and Montenegro, this film includes some unique images from Serbia - a Serbian Slava, Kalemegdan, the brand new Royal Palace.

A title for Belgrade reads: 'Rebuilt after complete destruction in the Great War, seems to reflect the history of Yugoslavia, one of invasion-defeat-victory and regeneration.'

Published in Balkans
Yugoslavia_1961_3

 

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by a British family from the North of England visiting the Adriatic coast in 1960.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

 

 

Published in Balkans

Trieste_3

Trieste has always been a bridge between East and West, a buzzing cosmopolitan city – for centuries the major port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its most important centre after Vienna, Budapest and Prague – an Imperial Free City till 1918, when it transferred to Italy.

A centre of Slav life for centuries - the Triestine Serb merchants and ship owners, brought here by Empress Maria Theresa in the 18th century, built their church of St Spyridon, which still adorns the city today. Trieste is home to a large Slovenian community.

A divided area between East and West after 1945, Trieste was firmly integrated into the Italian Republic after 1954, but with a disputed eastern border way into the 1970s.

During the Cold War Trieste was a real hub. People from all over Yugoslavia would travel overnight to reach its markets at dawn –jeans, records and other precious Western goods were then laden onto buses and small Fiats and shipped east, to Bulgaria and further on, where their value multiplied and they offered high status. In its turn, Trieste offered shelter and passage further West to Eastern Europeans on the run from Communism.

 

Amateur footage, transferred from Kodachrome Standard 8 mm Film.

Published in Balkans

 

In the 1960s and 1970s the Yugoslav authorities offered attractive conditions to Western cruise companies. Unlike in other Communist countries in the area, foreign tourists to Yugoslavia were less conspicuously followed by the security services.

They were allowed to move around freely and capture the beauty of the scenery, but also the everyday lives of people. Like here - from Venetian and Genoese Korčula (Curzola) to Dubrovnik along the Dalmatian coast, today's Croatia.

Footage converted from 16 and 8 mm Kodachrome film.

Share your memories.

Published in Balkans