Published in Balkans

Kingdom_Yugoslavia_1929

 

A very rare item from our collection. Converted from a silent 16 mm film, with titles. 

British production with some of the earliest moving pictures from the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, newly renamed by King Alexander I in 1929.

Apart from the Adriatic coast, Bosnia and Montenegro, this film includes some unique images from Serbia - a Serbian Slava, Kalemegdan, the brand new Royal Palace.

A title for Belgrade reads: 'Rebuilt after complete destruction in the Great War, seems to reflect the history of Yugoslavia, one of invasion-defeat-victory and regeneration.'

Published in Balkans

Yugoslavia 1926

In the mid-1920s the prominent German photographer Kurt Hielscher was invited by the government in Belgrade to travel to Yugoslavia and create a book with images of the state, founded only a few years earlier. Kurt Hielscher had already published similar and very successful books about Italy, Spain and Germany, so he took up the invitation with enthusiasm.

In Belgrade he got an interpreter, letters of introduction to all local authorities and cars were at his disposal. Hielscher gratefully acknowledges all help in this endeavour.  He also thanks the Zeiss-Ikon and Agfa factories for their outstanding cameras, lenses and photo plates.

The journey - from the Alps to Novo Mesto towards Bulgaria - produced 1200 photographs, from which he chose 191. In Hielscher's words, those were the few "which would try to show the attractive, diverse character of the landscape, the architecture, and way of life of the Yugoslavs... I didn't want to create a collection of postcards".

The result is a stunning and often moving collection, published in a book in 1926 in Berlin by Ernst Wassmuth AG.

On Agfa Chromo Isorapid plates.

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans
Yugoslavia_1961_3

 

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by a British family from the North of England visiting the Adriatic coast in 1960.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

 

 

Published in Balkans

Yugo_1978_3

A rare Kodachrome film, 1978.

 

Communist Yugoslavia was a major tourist destination for tourists from Western Europe and the US. Here is an extract from amateur footage shot by British tourists who were visiting the Adriatic coast in the summer of 1978.

Did you or your family spend your holiday in Yugoslavia? We'd love to hear from you. Share your memories.

Converted from 8 mm film.

All rights to use purchased.

U bivšoj Jugoslaviji 1978 godine 

This Kodachrome film is just a beautiful and non-political piece of history. More on the seemingly still open question whether Yugoslavia was a Communist society despite its relatively open borders, was it dogmatic...did it ever try do deal with events of the recent past, like Bleiburg or the fate of its ethnic Germans, Istria, is available on: 

Tito in Moscow 1972

Communist Nostalgia

Published in Balkans
Letter Home 1915

A moving document from another era. A German soldier writes back home from occupied Serbia, 1915. Passed by the military censor.

In which Emir Kusturica movie does this Serbian spa feature?!

What else was Banja Koviljača remarkable for during the Cold War?

Published in Balkans

Yugoslavia on Kodachrome

A rare Kodachrome film for Pan Am Airways, 1964.

MyCentury.tv

Yugoslavia was the only Communist-controlled country in today's Eastern Europe Pan Am flew to during the Cold War – showing how important the country was at that time.

A cultural icon of the XX Century, Pan American World Airways, or Pan Am, was the largest international air carrier in the US from 1927 until its collapse its 1991.

Pan-Am is remembered by many for its routes to divided Berlin - Tempelhof and Tegel.

Did you fly on Pan Am to Yugoslavia or West Berlin? Did you visit Yugoslavia's Adriatic coast, or perhaps Ohrid?

Share your memories.

Converted from 16 mm film.

All rights to use purchased.

This Kodachrome film is just a beautiful and non-political piece of history. More on the seemingly still open question whether Yugoslavia was a Communist society despite its relatively open borders, was it dogmatic...did it ever try do deal with events of the recent past, like Bleiburg or the fate of its ethnic Germans, Istria... is available on: 

Tito in Moscow 1972

Communist Nostalgia

Published in Balkans

An unusual document of its time. British independent film maker John Dooley travelled to Yugoslavia in 1959.

This educational film focuses on the Adriatic coast, the river Neretva, Mostar, Sarajevo, finishing in the federal capital Belgrade. It presents the opportunities and challenges for the country's economy, agriculture and political development given its unique position at the height of the Cold War.

Converted from 16 mm film.

Camera & Script John Dooley Plymouth Films Ltd, now defunct.

Published in Balkans

These pictures were taken right at the end of the Bosnian War. The UN peacekeepers from Ukraine were preparing to return home to their newly independent country. During the war they provided vital services to keep Sarajevo going - here we see the damage to the city through their eyes. A flying visit also to Vukovar on the Danube, where the war for Yugoslavia's succession started in 1991.

Sarajevo 96
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Sarajevo 96

Photography © Oleksandr Klymenko

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans

When the Bosnian War started in 1992 among the first international troops to arrive were the blue helmets from Ukraine. The soldiers provided vital help in and around Sarajevo - from bread and water to fuel. They brought with them their own worries from a newly independent country, perhaps they had an insight into this conflict like nobody else? The Ukrainian photographer Oleksandr Klymenko documented their mission.

Do you remember the Ukrainian soldiers in Bosnia?

Sarajevo 94
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Sarajevo 94

Photography: © Oleksandr Klymenko

Published in Photo Gallery Balkans